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Far from the usual steak fajitas recipe

Far from the usual steak fajitas recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Beef
  • Cuts of beef
  • Steak

I just made this up and it was a wicked lunch. Taste as you go and decide how much or how little you want of everything.

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 2 good quality steaks
  • 2 peppers, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 100g cherry tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 handful spinach, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • oil, for frying
  • salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 lime or lemon, juiced
  • 4 tortilla wraps, to serve
  • chopped fresh coriander, to garnish

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:20min ›Ready in:25min

  1. Put two good quality steaks in the oven to cook to your taste. I cooked mine for about 15 minutes on 200 C / Gas 6.
  2. I used my mini chopper (which is like a small blender) to chop all the veg so that the pieces are really small and easy to spoon on, but slice all veg how you want it. I put all of the veg and spices into the chopper all at once.
  3. Throw the mix into a pan on medium heat with a small dash of oil (I used chilli oil). Add salt and pepper to taste and let everything soften for about 10 minutes.
  4. Take steak out the oven. Let rest a few minutes, then cut into slices and add to the pan along with the juice of one lemon or lime.
  5. Once everything is heated through and smelling delicious serve in wraps garnished with coriander.

Tip

I actually added the ginger by accident but it just added to the flavour.

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Perfect Steak Fajitas

These zingy Steak Fajitas are quick and easy to make with flank steak and fajita vegetables. Marinated in a simple yet delicious fajita marinade, then quickly seared for medium-rare perfection – the flavor in these is unbelievable!


Sizzling Steak Fajitas

Make the most of your Dual Sided Grizzler Plate with this succulent sizzling steak fajitas recipe, courtesy of Ooni ambassador James Synowicki of @zimmysnook. No detail is spared in flavour, whether it's the zingy steak marinade, creamy guacamole dip, or colourful Pico De Gallo to serve.

Ingredients
Serves 2-3 as a main

For the Marinade:
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp fresh lime zest
1 tsp fresh orange zest
2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp fresh lime juice
2 tbsp fresh orange juice
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh coriander
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tbsp minced fresh jalapeño
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/2 tsp Kosher salt

For the Fajitas
2 x 16 oz striploin steaks, trimmed of all visible fat and gristle (minimum 1.5” thick)
1 small red onion, sliced into 1/4” strips
1 small yellow onion, sliced into 1/4” strips
4 small bell peppers (green, red, yellow, orange), sliced, 1/4” strips
1 medium jalapeño, thinly sliced circles
Olive oil
Kosher salt & freshly ground pepper

For the Guacamole
2 avocados
1 lime, juiced
2 tbsp chopped sweet onion
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp olive oil
1 jalapeño (roasted, grilled or charred- skin removed), diced (seeds optional)
2 cloves of roasted garlic
2 tbsp coriander leaves, chopped (optional)

For the Pico de Gallo
1 1/2 cups tomatoes (seeded and diced)
1/2 cup red onion diced
1 tbsp jalapeno diced
1 tbsp garlic minced
2 tbsp lime juice
2 tbsp coriander (some reserved for garnish)
Salt, pepper

To serve
Sour cream (mix with sriracha for a spicy kick!)
Flour or Corn tortillas, warmed
Lime wedges

Method
To prepare the marinade, mix all the ingredients together in a bowl. To prepare the fajitas, place the steak in a large resealable bag and pour the marinade in. Press out as much air as possible and seal the bag. Give the bag a good shake to distribute the marinade evenly. Place in the refrigerator for 2-3 hours, laying it down flat. Flip the bag over halfway.

To prepare the guacamole, place all ingredients into a mortar and pestle and mix to desired consistency. Alternatively use a fork and bowl, or, toss all the pre-chopped ingredients (except the avocados and coriander) in a food processor and blitz, then add the avocado & coriander and process to desired consistency. Store in an airtight container, or cover with plastic wrap until ready to use.

To prepare the Pico de Gallo, Mix all ingredients together. Store in an airtight container, or cover with plastic wrap until ready to use.

Fire up your Ooni pizza oven and leave to preheat for 15-20 minutes. Place the Ooni Dual Sided Grizzler Plate flat side up in the middle of the oven and preheat for 4-6 minutes until the cast iron temp reaches 315°C. You can check the temperature inside your Ooni quickly and easily using the Ooni Infrared Thermometer.

Using the handles, carefully remove the hot Grizzler Plate and place it on the wooden base. Place the steaks to the right hand side of the plate. Return to the oven, placing as far from the flames as possible.

Cook for 2 minutes, then remove the plate and rotate the steaks (front to back) and exchange positions (left to right). Return to the oven and cook for a further 2 minutes. Flip the steaks and cook for another 1.5 minutes, then rotate and exchange positions. This ensures the steaks are evenly cooked all the way through. Look for an internal temperature of 57-60 °C . Remove the steaks to a platter and tent with foil while you cook the vegetables, the steak temperature will rise to 62 °C for medium rare as it rests.

Next, prepare the veg. Pour 2 tbsp oil onto the grizzle and add the onions, season with salt and pepper and mix to combine. Turn the temperature dial to its lowest setting and return the pan to the right hand side of the oven.

Cook the onions for about 6 minutes (stirring occasionally) until softened. Remove the pan and add the peppers & jalapeños, season with salt & pepper, add a splash of oil and mix carefully to combine with onions (the Grizzler plate will be full, but since the veggies are cooking from the top and bottom, they will cook evenly).

Return the Grizzler plate to the right hand side of the oven, and adjust temperature back to high. Let them cook undisturbed for 2 minutes. Stir then continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the veg is soft and spotted with colour, roughly 4 to 6 minutes.

While the peppers finish cooking, begin thinly slicing the steaks across the grain. Once the peppers are done, remove the Grizzler plate and place the sliced steak on top of the steaming hot peppers & onions.

To serve, surround the hot grizzler plate with all the accompaniments. Fresh guacamole, Pico de Gallo, warmed tortillas, sour cream, and lime wedges. Stack your tortillas just the way you like, wrap, and enjoy!


Related Video

I don't know what i did wrong but the meat was tough. I cut it across the grain and did not over cook.

Excellent, fast recipe. I chose this recipe because all the other skirt steak recipes suggested an overnight marinade and I had an hour. I added 1 Tbl whole cumin, an entire sliced jalepeno, and dashed Adolf's meat tenderizer on the steak before putting it into the 1 g. zip lock bag with the lime, oil, and salt. The grilled onions came out great. After they were done, I lightly wiped off the marinade, sprinkled on coarse black pepper and grilled on med-low for 5 min on each side. They were really delicious.

This has become my go to quick and easy sumer entertaining recipe. I'm making it for my third time this weekend and each time i get rave reviews. I double the onions because I coudl make a meal of them alone and their delish as a sandwich topping later in the week.

This was a winning recipe. The marinade is delicious we tried both skirt steak and flank steak skirt has a bit more fat. actually, both were delicious, although we preferred the skirt steak! We grilled red onions which added a nice sweet compliment. Great recipe and easy. Fun for a party!

Our store was out of skirt steak, so we substituted flank steak. I don't know if it was the cut of meat or the marinade, but the steak was fantastic. This was a terrific weeknight meal.

I marinated the steak for longer as some reviewers suggested, and it was tasty. I also made this with "Guacamole with fresh corn and chipotle" from this site, and that was almost the best part.

This is excellent for a no-stress lunch or dinner. I like to jazz mine up by mixing salt and ground cumin as my pre-grilling rub for the steak. Also instead of plain balsamic vinegar, I used a balsamic glaze or reduction. It makes the onion sweeter & more delicious!

I have made this several times. I have used skirt steak, flank steak and top sirloin - depending on what's available at the time. Skirt steak takes the least time marinating, but none of them take more than 30 minutes to an hour. The onions are awesome and add so much to the fajitas. Serve with guacamole, pico de gallo, black beans and the Rice and Green Chile Pilaf from this site. Great party food!

The flavors for the marinade smelled good during the preparation so I was disappointed that the steak was not as flavorful when cooked. I even added garlic for extra flavor. I would make it again but I would let the steak sit in the marinade longer (3+ hours) in the fridge.

Really, I'm completely confused by these reviews. I made this with skirt steak exactly as in the recipe, so of course it was good -- skirt steak is truly a tasty cut of meat no matter what. But the 10-minute marinade in the lime juice did nothing for the meat, and of course you cook meat seasoned. so really, a fantastic recipe would be just to grill the skirt steak with some pepper and make fajitas out of it. Add some grilled peppers, onions, salsa, and fresh lime juice, and then it's super.

This was good and quite easy. I used flank steak instead of skirt steak (easier to find here), and grilled an orange and a red pepper with one onion, which was plenty of onion.

These are fabulous as long as you cut the meat across the grain.

I made this recipe as part of a mexican themed dinner party, and they were the hit of the party. The steak was so delicious and tender (also made chicken fajitas with the same marinade-good, but preferred the steak!). I've been making fajitas for years but this is by far the best recipe I've tried.

Look no further for the perfect fajita recipe! We love this! I always need to find a few meals for entertaining over christmas - this one is always served to a house of 16 guests - everyone can tailor their own with toppings of their choice. Great tasting and fairly easy to prepare - can just as easily make this for a large crowd. The onions tossed with salt and vinegar make a great addition - though, I always add sliced grilled red peppers with mine.

I made this dish last night on the stove. I was not blown away like I thought Iɽ be. They tasted like regular fajitas you could get anywhere. We used flat iron steak instead of skirt steak and added red & green bell peppers.

This has become a family favorite! I serve it all the time with some variations. I cook the meat in the oven, usually just salt and peppered and doused with lime juice. I also bake the onions, when they are soft, I drizzle them with balsamic vinegar and olive oil and a sprinkle of salt and pepper and bake them until they start to char. Delicious! I serve this with really good home made tortillas from a local store, diced avocado, a diced tomato and basil salad with pine nuts and walnut oil (from Patricia Wells' Provence cookbook!), some shredded cheese or some mexican cheese, sour cream, different salsas including green, mango and a basic pico de gallo. Really, whatever I am in the mood for. But! I always serve it with bowls of limes for people to squeeze on their meat. I have only gotten rave reviews for this dish!

I really liked this, don't get me wrong - but I feel like I'm missing something having read the other reviews. I found it difficult to taste the lime. The onions are great though. A really nice mid week supper - but nothing more.

Excellent. It was so delicious, I'm speechless

A family favorite! The lime is subtle, but that increases the excellence of this masterpiece of a recipe. Try mixing peppers with onions for color.

this was a pretty easy dish & a hit at the dinner table. I didn't use skirt steak but some leftover steak from the day before & it was still really good.

I just made this for my husband and we both loved it. I did everything pretty much as written, however, there was no skirt steak available so I used flank steak. I cooked the onions and the steak on the George Foreman BBQ grill (electric). I also added red bell pepper for color and flavor. I used low fat, low carb, whole wheat tortillas that actually taste good (HA!). I served this with black beans, a corn risotto made with habanero pepper jack and a nice, crisp reisling. Great fast meal and the left overs were good the next day!

Grilled both the onions and steak on a stovetop grill pan (flank steak) and it worked out great! The salt content was a bit much but I limited it by not adding salt to the onions with the balsamic at the end. Would be great with avocado added.

yum. made these fajitas with mexican black beans and quick corn risotto. Will definitely make again.

A super quick, super easy week-night meal. Prepared almost as directed. Marinated skirt steak about one hour. Have made with flank as well and was good. With skirt steak it was great. The balsamic is a must. Yuuuuuummmm.

Made it with chicken breast, too, since my boyfriend shies away from red meat, but it was so good he tried the beef as well! Couldn't grill, so did everything on the stove, adding some tabasco as the meat cooked. Onions were great cooked in the balsamic.


Easy Steak Fajitas

It’s funny. When I lived in Los Angeles, we could grill all year long. And I never really took it for granted until this week. And now Ben uses the grill in 40 degree weather in his parka and beanie, shivering.

I guess it’s not that funny at all. Well, at least I’m not the one outside grilling in the coldest weather ever.

Anyway, if you’re in Chiberia like me, you can employ your partner to go outside to take care of all the labor. Or if you are lucky enough to live in Southern California with sunny 70 degree weather, you can definitely grill this.

But for those who don’t have access to a grill, no problem. You can still make the easiest steak fajitas ever. The steak can be thrown onto a cast iron skillet, and the veggies can cook on the stovetop while your meat rests.

See, told you. Super easy, quick, and fast.

Serve with tortillas (you can easily throw your tortillas on the grill for 30 seconds while you cook your steak/peppers/onion), pico and guacamole. Or you can simply eat your steak and veggies because, well, Atkins diet, no?


The BEST Chicken or Steak Fajitas

I know you’ve all been posed the question (and I have no idea where or when, but somehow I have had to answer it many times thus far in my relatively short life): “If you had to pick one thing to eat every day for the rest of your life, what would it be?” And while I would hate to be required to pick just one thing (since I can’t really live on chocolate alone, but certainly can’t live without it either…oh, the angst!) This meal would be one of my top contenders. I love fajitas that much. But not just any fajitas- they have to be good. Really good. So toss out the store-bought seasoning packet and the 50 for $1 bag of tortillas. I’m going to show you a flavor-packed marinade that you can whip up in a flash. And when you combine it with homemade tortillas and all the fixins, these will be the best chicken or steak fajitas you’ve ever eaten!

The secret really is in the marinade. And my little trick is to reserve just a little of it to drizzle on at the very end for an extra punch of flavor. You can use your choice of meat boneless chicken breasts work great, as do chicken thighs or tenders. Steak is also awesome–flank steak and sirloin are both fantastic cuts for this recipe. We often do both chicken and steak. Grab whatever colors of peppers and onions you have around and grill them up.

I like to serve it on a big platter and let everyone serve themselves (but if you want to make sure everything is distributed evenly, you could also mix everything up on the platter.)


Give Fajitas, a Tex-Mex Classic, the Treatment They Deserve

That’s a question I found myself asking recently as I went on a fajitas crawl in Los Angeles, where I live, to check in on that essential and once fashionable Tex-Mex dish. The sizzling platters that arrived at my table never varied they came bearing the requisite grilled strips of skirt steak, chicken or shrimp, usually overcooked, with seared onions and peppers that were greasy and underseasoned. Alongside were the predictable bowls of grated yellow Cheddar cheese, sour cream, guacamole and salsa.

They were a far cry from the fajitas I used to eat at backyard barbecues with Mexican-American families in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, where I lived and worked in the 1970s.

My friends would grill cumin- and chile-rubbed skirt steak, at that time a cheap cut of meat, slice it thin and serve it on irresistible, freshly made flour tortillas. They would cook onions and chiles, sweet peppers and sometimes corn on the same grill until the vegetables were nicely charred, and serve them along with the meat on the warm tortillas, with grated Cheddar and crumbled queso fresco, fresh tomato salsa and homemade guacamole that they mashed in the molcajetes — mortar and pestles made from volcanic rock — that we routinely brought back from Mexico when we went across the border to shop.

They called the grilled strips of beef and the popular tacos they made with them fajitas (faja means strip or belt in Spanish). A few Tex-Mex restaurants in the Valley also served fajitas, but the dish was local, far from mainstream.

Image

Fajitas had been around on both sides of the border for as long as ranchers in South and West Texas had been using immigrant Mexican labor during roundups. The ranchers partly paid their cowboys with cheap parts of the steer — heads, entrails and trimmings, which included skirt and flank steaks. With the heads, the workers made barbacoa de cabeza (barbecued cow’s head), and with the entrails, they made menudo (tripe stew). The skirt steaks were the most desirable. They grilled them over the camp fire, sometimes tenderizing them first in a lime marinade, and ate them in warm flour tortillas.

The dish became known elsewhere in Texas during the course of the 1970s as a diaspora of restaurateurs who had roots in the Rio Grande Valley began to put them on their menus. An enterprising Austin butcher named Sonny Falcon, in an effort to increase his skirt steak sales, created wildly popular Fajita King concessions at rodeos, fairs and festivals all over the state. They were called Tacos a la Ninfa at Ninfa Rodriguez Laurenzo’s successful Houston restaurant, Ninfa’s.

But the real fajita breakthrough, according to the Austin Chronicle food writer Virginia B. Wood, came in 1982, when a German-born chef, George Weidmann, put Sizzling Fajitas on his menu at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Austin. The restaurant quickly became the most profitable in the Hyatt chain, and fajitas became a nationwide phenomenon.

In turn, the price of skirt steak skyrocketed. My local butcher sells it today for $18.49 a pound.

You would think that there would have been a fair amount of fajita innovation over these last 30 years, but except for the dish opening itself up to chicken and shrimp, there hasn’t, at least not that I saw.

I decided to head into my kitchen and change things up. I wasn’t interested in altering the dish in any profound way, but I did want my versions to have more flavor and less grease than restaurant fajitas. I stuck to steak, chicken and shrimp, and I bumped up their flavor with a rub for the beef (chile powder, cumin, salt), chipotle adobo for the chicken and shrimp, and a citrusy marinade and lots of cilantro for all.

The accompanying vegetables are now on equal footing with the proteins. I sear a generous mix of peppers and onions and season them with fresh green chiles, garlic and cumin. When they’re just about ready to come off the heat, I add a few tablespoons of the marinade mix, held back from the meat or shrimp, which flavors the vegetables and deglazes the pan. I added zucchini and corn to the onions and peppers for the shrimp fajitas.

Feel free to mix and match vegetables and proteins, and to play around with other vegetables for this exuberant one-dish meal.


Beef Fajitas

When I get a hankering for beef fajitas, I pretty much can think of nothing else until I eat them.

Delicious grilled flank steak served with tortillas and all the fixins. One of my favorite things on earth!

medium onions, halved and sliced

orange bell pepper, sliced

yellow bell pepper, sliced

Cheese (grated cheddar/Jack or crumbled queso fresco), for topping

Cilantro leaves, for topping

  1. In a dish, mix together the olive oil, Worcestershire sauce, lime juice, garlic, cumin, chili powder, red pepper flakes, salt, pepper, and sugar until combined. Pour half of the marinade into a separate dish. In one dish, place the flank steak, turning it over to coat. In the second dish, place all the veggies, turning to coat. Cover the dishes with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for at least 2 hours.
  2. Prepare the tortillas and toppings.
  3. Heat a heavy skillet over medium-high heat and drizzle in some oil. Add the veggies and cook them for a few minutes, until they're cooked but still slightly firm and have nice black/brown pieces. Remove to a plate and set aside.
  4. Heat the same same skillet (or a grill pan if you have it) over high heat and drizzle in some oil. Cook the meat for about 2 minutes per side until medium rare. Remove and allow to rest on a cutting board for 5 minutes. Slice the meat right before serving and serve with all the fixins. Delicious!

When I get a hankering for beef fajitas, I pretty much can think of nothing else until I eat them. I made them over the weekend after a profound craving set in&mdashand no, I&rsquom not pregnant I think as far as I know&mdashand ohhhhh, was the reward so sweet.

Here&rsquos how I like to make &rsquoem.

Start by drizzling some olive oil into a dish&hellip

Then add some Worcestershire sauce.

And there you have it! Beef fajitas.

Then slice up a bunch o&rsquo limes&hellip

And squeeze the juice on in.

For the spices, I used cumin&hellip

Because I love cumin and I associate it with anything Tex-Mexy.

And red pepper flakes for heat.

I have no idea why I just said bada bing.

Sometimes these things just come out.

And just a little bit of sugar, because it makes the savory even better.

Now, whisk the whole mess together&hellip

And pour half of it into a second dish.

I&rsquoll tell you why in a minute.

Grab your hunka beef and throw it into one of the dishes&hellip

Then turn the meat over to coat it in the marinade.

Now for the veggies, which are an important part of fajitas: slice up a couple of onions&hellip

But you can just pick one or two.

You can also do diced zucchini.

Throw them into the second dish of stuff&hellip

Use your hands to toss the veggies around and coat them in the marinade. It won&rsquot totally gloop them up, it will just give them a little coating of spice.

And here&rsquos the thing: A lot of people just throw the meat and veggies into the dish together. A lot of people like to just marinate the meat and veggies together.

But some people don&rsquot like the idea of marinating raw meat and raw veggies together.

I&rsquom that way with chicken. But not with beef.

But for the purposes of this post, I showed them marinating separately to show you how easy it is.

Now, just stick &rsquoem in the fridge and let &rsquoem marinate for a good couple of hours.

When you&rsquore ready to make the fajitas, heat a skillet over medium-high heat and drizzle in a little olive oil or canola oil. Throw in the veggies&hellip

And cook them, stirring them around&hellip

Until they&rsquore nice and golden, with some flecks of brown and black. I don&rsquot like to let the veggies get soggy I still want &rsquoem to have a little bite!

Remove the veggies to a bowl or plate, then get the fixins ready: I crumbled up some queso fresco, which I love, but you can use any grated cheese, too!

I just grabbed some salsa and sour cream to go with the cheese, but if you want to whip up some pico de gallo and/or guacamole, I wouldn&rsquot blame you one bit.

Drizzle some oil in the same skillet or on a grill pan if you have one, and throw on the flank steak. The heat needs to be very high!

Grill it for a minute at first, then rotate it 45 degrees on the same side to make lovely grill marks.

No more than a minute later, flip the flank steak&hellip

To the other side and cook it, rotating it 45 degrees again, for a total of a minute, minute-and-a-half.

You don&rsquot want to overcook the flank steak, and because it&rsquos thin, it will cook in no time! So probably a total of 3 to 4 minutes is all you want to do&hellipmaybe even a little less.

I&rsquom so terrified of overcooking beef. I avoid it at all costs.

Unless it&rsquos ground beef. Then I cook the heck out of it with wild abandon.


Sizzling Steak Fajitas

Make the most of your Dual Sided Grizzler Plate with this succulent sizzling steak fajitas recipe, courtesy of Ooni ambassador James Synowicki of @zimmysnook. No detail is spared in flavor, whether it's the zingy steak marinade, creamy guacamole dip, or colorful Pico De Gallo to serve.

Ingredients
Serves 2-3 as a main

For the Marinade:
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp fresh lime zest
1 tsp fresh orange zest
2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp fresh lime juice
2 tbsp fresh orange juice
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh cilantro
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tbsp minced fresh jalapeño
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/2 tsp Kosher salt

For the Fajitas
2 x 16 oz striploin steaks, trimmed of all visible fat and gristle (minimum 1.5” thick)
1 small red onion, sliced into 1/4” strips
1 small yellow onion, sliced into 1/4” strips
4 small bell peppers (green, red, yellow, orange), sliced, 1/4” strips
1 medium jalapeño, thinly sliced circles
Olive oil
Kosher salt & freshly ground pepper

For the Guacamole
2 avocados
1 lime, juiced
2 tbsp chopped sweet onion
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp olive oil
1 jalapeño (roasted, grilled or charred- skin removed), diced (seeds optional)
2 cloves of roasted garlic
2 tbsp cilantro leaves, chopped (optional)

For the Pico de Gallo
1 1/2 cups tomatoes (seeded and diced)
1/2 cup red onion diced
1 tbsp jalapeno diced
1 tbsp garlic minced
2 tbsp lime juice
2 tbsp cilantro (some reserved for garnish)
Salt, pepper

To serve
Sour cream (mix with sriracha for a spicy kick!)
Flour or Corn tortillas, warmed
Lime wedges

Method
To prepare the marinade, mix all the ingredients together in a bowl. To prepare the fajitas, place the steak in a large resealable bag and pour the marinade in. Press out as much air as possible and seal the bag. Give the bag a good shake to distribute the marinade evenly. Place in the refrigerator for 2-3 hours, laying it down flat. Flip the bag over halfway.

To prepare the guacamole, place all ingredients into a mortar and pestle and mix to desired consistency. Alternatively use a fork and bowl, or, toss all the pre-chopped ingredients (except the avocados and cilantro) in a food processor and blitz, then add the avocado & cilantro and process to desired consistency. Store in an airtight container, or cover with plastic wrap until ready to use.

To prepare the Pico de Gallo, Mix all ingredients together. Store in an airtight container, or cover with plastic wrap until ready to use.

Fire up your Ooni pizza oven and leave to preheat for 15-20 minutes. Place the Ooni Dual Sided Grizzler Plate flat side up in the middle of the oven and preheat for 4-6 minutes until the cast iron temp reaches 600°F. You can check the temperature inside your Ooni quickly and easily using the Ooni Infrared Thermometer.

Using the handles, carefully remove the hot Grizzler Plate and place it on the wooden base. Place the steaks to the right hand side of the plate. Return to the oven, placing as far from the flames as possible.

Cook for 2 minutes, then remove the plate and rotate the steaks (front to back) and exchange positions (left to right). Return to the oven and cook for a further 2 minutes. Flip the steaks and cook for another 1.5 minutes, then rotate and exchange positions. This ensures the steaks are evenly cooked all the way through. Look for an internal temperature of 135-140 ° F. Remove the steaks to a platter and tent with foil while you cook the vegetables, the steak temperature will rise to 145 ° F for medium rare as it rests.

Next, prepare the veg. Pour 2 tbsp oil onto the grizzle and add the onions, season with salt and pepper and mix to combine. Turn the temperature dial to its lowest setting and return the pan to the right hand side of the oven.

Cook the onions for about 6 minutes (stirring occasionally) until softened. Remove the pan and add the peppers & jalapeños, season with salt & pepper, add a splash of oil and mix carefully to combine with onions (the Grizzler plate will be full, but since the veggies are cooking from the top and bottom, they will cook evenly).

Return the Grizzler plate to the right hand side of the oven, and adjust temperature back to high. Let them cook undisturbed for 2 minutes. Stir then continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the veg is soft and spotted with colour, roughly 4 to 6 minutes.

While the peppers finish cooking, begin thinly slicing the steaks across the grain. Once the peppers are done, remove the Grizzler plate and place the sliced steak on top of the steaming hot peppers & onions.

To serve, surround the hot grizzler plate with all the accompaniments. Fresh guacamole, Pico de Gallo, warmed tortillas, sour cream, and lime wedges. Stack your tortillas just the way you like, wrap, and enjoy!


Quick Stove-Top Beef Fajitas

A traditional Tex-Mex dish that dates back to the 1930s, fajitas are grilled strips of beef that are typically served with onions, bell peppers, and tortillas. The term fajita technically refers only to the beef version of this dish, since the name comes from faja, the cut of meat from which they are traditionally made. Although many variations have derived from the original dish of skirt or flank steak strips, the beef fajita is still king, even if chicken, pork, seafood, and all-veggie fajitas have conquered millions of palates around the world.

Our delicious recipe for beef fajita is a shortcut from the usual version that requires the meat to sit in a marinade, so this pan-fried recipe will serve you well when you don’t have enough time or equipment for grilling. Naturally gluten free, this dish will suit such dietary needs when served with 100 percent corn tortillas—remember to always check the labels.

Our fajitas are juicy and have a marvelous all-around flavor. They are easy to make and come together fast. You can customize them to your needs, likes, and dietary preferences. At this point, purists aside, all is fair in the fajita game. Use lamb, shrimp, tofu, tempeh, or seitan and add different veggies or seasonings.