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10 Best Cities Around the World for the Gluten-Free (Slideshow)

10 Best Cities Around the World for the Gluten-Free (Slideshow)



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Gluten giving you guff? Add these cities to your vacation wish list

Not only is this vibrant South African city so diverse that it boasts a wide variety of gluten-free cuisines — such as South Indian — but the South African diet is very meat-centric anyway, complemented with vegetables and fruit. Since Cape Town is a coastal city, it also specializes in a variety of seafood. For a breathtaking experience, go to the allergy-friendly Kirstenbosch Tea Room, located at the beautiful Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, one of our top 10 parks in the world for picnicking.

Cape Town

Not only is this vibrant South African city so diverse that it boasts a wide variety of gluten-free cuisines — such as South Indian — but the South African diet is very meat-centric anyway, complemented with vegetables and fruit. For a breathtaking experience, go to the allergy-friendly Kirstenbosch Tea Room, located at the beautiful Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, one of our top 10 parks in the world for picnicking.

Cochin, India

Denver

Larger, coastal cities often get credit for paving the way in regard to major changes in America, but when it comes to gluten-free menu options, the trend first started in middle of the country. Denver has one of the lowest percentages of obese adults in the nation, so it’s really no surprise it would lead the charge toward accommodating folks with dietary restrictions. One of the city’s stand-out eateries? Panzano — which, in spite of being an Italian restaurant, features separate gluten-free menus for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even brunch. Thank Executive Chef Elise Wiggins for this, as she altered the AAA Four Diamond-winning restaurant’s menu following her brother’s celiac disease diagnosis.

Dublin

Ireland is known as the land of Guinness, brown bread, and fish and chips, but it’s also a land that’s quite familiar with celiac disease. Due to the high amount of sufferers nationally, the Irish Coeliac’s Association was founded way back in 1963, and has been promoting awareness of the illness ever since. When the gluten-free movement first began, Ireland (specifically its larger cities) started rolling out safe foods faster than anyone else, with Tesco (founded in neighboring England) leading the charge as one of the first supermarket chains to introduce an entire gluten-free section. The country also makes it extremely simple to find gluten-free food with the website Gluten Free Ireland, which lists over 1,000 celiac-friendly restaurants, hotels, bars, producers, and activities. Pro Tips: Skip the Guinness and go with a cider instead. Bulmers (Magners in the U.S.) is naturally gluten-free, and just as popular. Still craving fish and chips? Try the gluten-free option at Beshoff Bros.

Mexico City

The big thing to avoid in Mexico in regards to gluten is the flour tortillas. Thankfully, in many regions, corn tortillas are more popular and (history lesson!) actually predate the flour versions, which were introduced by exiled Spanish Jews. Mexico City is one of these corn-centric places, so you can generally feel free to enjoy the wonderful street offerings without fear. However, it can get a little tricky when things are fried alongside “unsafe” items or dusted with flour, but thankfully more and more restaurants in Mexico are acknowledging this by marking menu items as gluten-free, when applicable. When in doubt, just remember the phrase “libre de gluten” (“gluten-free”).

Learn to make your own corn tortillas at home with this recipe.

New York City

This probably goes without saying, but you can get just about anything in New York City. Whether you’re gluten-free, carb-free, sugar-free, or water-free (OK, I made that last one up), you’ll feel at home in the Big Apple. And if your home is already New York, you’ll be happy to know you can get GF bagels and pizza (at Rubirosa and Tompkins Square, respectively). Plus, you can always count on New Yorkers to back the latest trend — and despite some folks actually being physically gluten intolerant, there’s a whole slew of hipsters and other assorted city folk who not only jumped on the bandwagon, but they built it themselves…using eco-friendly, recycled parts. And it’s vintage.

Not only does Rubirosa have great GF pizza, but its pies were named No. 41 on our list of the best pizzas in America 2015. See the rest here.

Rome

At first, it seems contradictory. Italy, the land of pizza and pasta, is good for gluten-free-eaters? Of course! Otherwise the rise in popularity of GF diets could sink the entire economy. Thus, Italians immediately welcomed the gluten-intolerant with open, often gesticulating arms. When cooking at home, look for gluten-free options from pasta brands like Delallo, Jovial, Riso Bello, and Rustichella d’Abruzzo at the grocery store. Also, learn the phases “io sono celiaca” (I am a celiac) and “senza glutine” (gluten-free) and you’ll be in the clear at most eateries, which have been accommodating GF diners since before it was cool in the U.S.

San Francisco

Like New York City in the East, San Francisco is all about diversity, trends, and healthy options. To illustrate this point, just look at some of the restaurants that contain gluten-free options: Saha (Yemenese, French, and Californian cuisine), Pica Pica (Latin American), DOSA on Valencia (Indian), Slanted Door (Vietnamese), and Pacific Catch (seafood). Gluten-free without sacrificing variety? No wonder San Francisco is so popular.

Sydney

In regard to food labels, Australia is one of the strictest countries in the world. Not only does any product containing an allergy-causing ingredient need to be marked as such, but Coeliac Australia (a not-for-profit organization) also places an endorsement logo on approved products. This awareness carries over to restaurants as well, especially in larger cities, where GF folks will find at least one gluten-free option on almost every menu aside from those of fast food restaurants.

Tokyo

If you’re not familiar with GF foods, you might assume white rice contains gluten — however, it doesn’t! Pair this with seafood and meat (also naturally gluten-free), and you’ve covered a majority of the Japanese diet. The only thing you’ll need to avoid is soy sauce, most varieties of which contain gluten (traditional tamari is produced without gluten, but unless it's labeled gluten-free it's best to avoid anyway). The hardest part in many Tokyo restaurants will be expressing your concerns to the restaurant’s wait staff, so you might want to print out a card stating your gluten intolerance in Japanese, like this one.


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!


10 Helpful Tips for Gluten-Free Travelers

Traveling can be pretty hard on our bodies and often our digestive systems are the first to feel homesick. Between crazy wake up times for flights or constantly dining out, it can be difficult to have any kind of routine.

For anyone with additional dietary requirements, travel can be a much harder!

There are so many people who can’t eat gluten for health reasons. If this is you, rest assured that you don’t have to compromise while traveling.

These 10 helpful tips for gluten-free travelers will help you stay happy and healthy abroad!

Mezze in Amman, Jordan

1. Find a Supermarket (or Pharmacy)

This is what is going to make your gluten-free life so much easier. If the supermarket in the destination you’re in doesn’t have a decent gluten-free section, check out the pharmacy because they’ll probably stock more variety.

Keep in mind that the prices of gluten-free food can be more expensive, but supermarkets are still the way to go for the cheapest way to keep you diet on track. So grab some gluten-free bread, cookies and cake and have a picnic with your friends!

2. Learn Key Words in the Language of Your Destination

If you’re going to a country where English isn’t the first language, be prepared. Look up the words that mean the worst for gluten-free eaters, such as ‘wheat’ ‘barely’ ‘malt’ ‘rye,’ and write them down. When you’re at the supermarket, check the ingredients of anything before you buy it.

If one of these words pops up, you know it’s not the food for you.

3. Learn the Sentence for ‘I am Celiac’

There is a difference between ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac,’ but this is hard to convey if you’re in a foreign speaking country. Your best bet is to have this sentence in your mind and use it when you need.

It will certainly come in handy at restaurants and cafes when you want to double check something with the waiter. And hey, you’ll get to learn some new languages while taking care of your health!

Squash Blossoms at Spanish Market

4. Stock Up on Snacks When You Get the Chance

And snack properly when you do this. Avoid the sugary snacks and be grateful that you actually can’t have those unhealthy cookies because of the gluten in them. Dried fruits, nuts and cheese are your best bet for snacking to keep the energy levels up and fuel your body with protein for days full of sightseeing.

5. Always Ask at Restaurants

Even if the menu says it’s gluten-free (you’ll be well accustomed to spotting that glorious GF) it is still worth double checking. Make sure that the sauces, marinades and side dishes haven’t been cooked near gluten products. Remember that handy sentence you’ve learned for a foreign speaking country- this is the time to use it!

6. Don’t Be Too Proud

Not being able to digest gluten isn’t something to be ashamed of. If you’re planning on eating at a restaurant, and you really want a burger, your best guess is the bread won’t be gluten-free.

Stock up on gluten-free bread at the supermarket when you get the chance and carry some in your bag. Boom. Perfect for a burger. Explain the situation to your waiter and odds are you’ll be allowed to use your own bread.

There is never any harm in asking!

7. Do Some Research

Get to know the country you’re going to! Read reviews from other travelers and see what they’ve said about the gluten-free friendliness of the destination. Some countries deal with it better than other and are more accommodating. You may be surprised that some countries are incredibly gluten-free friendly- Italy included!

If you know what you’re heading into, you can be more prepared and in control of your diet.

Breakfast at La Loma Tree Lodge in Bocas del Toro, Panama

8. Don’t Make Assumptions

If a product is gluten-free back home, don’t assume it is abroad. Always check the ingredients, even if it’s a brand that you know and love. And remember, if you’re in a foreign speaking country, you’ve got those key words to look out on the ingredients list!

9. Google It

If you come across an ingredient that you’re not sure about, consult your trusty friend Google. It might take longer at the supermarket going through all the ingredients, but this is an important thing to make time for.

You, and your friends, would rather spend time at the supermarket looking after your health than spend time later on feeling sick!

10. If in Doubt, Don’t!

You don’t want to take chances with products that look a little sketchy and could make you sick. You know your body well and your gluten limitations, so you know how your body is going to react. If something doesn’t look or feel right, don’t eat it.

Trust your gut- literally!